Vision Payroll

October 31, 2011

IRS to Present Webinar on Reporting of Employer Healthcare Coverage on Form W-2

Today at 2 pm, EDT, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will present a webinar titled, Reporting of Employer Healthcare Coverage on Form W-2

Several Topics to Be Covered in Form W-2 Webinar

The Reporting of Employer-Sponsored Health Plan Coverage on Form W-2 (Affordable Care Act Provision 9002) webinar will explain what employers and employees need to know about the provision including:

  • What changes employees will see in their Form W-2
  • When employers must begin reporting the benefits on the Form W-2
  • Transition relief for certain employers, plans, and situations
  • Which employers need to include the benefits on the Form W-2
  • How employers report the benefits on the Form W-2
  • What valuation methods employers can use to determine the amounts to report on the Form W-2

Systems Must Meet Certain Minimum Requirements

The IRS has certain minimum requirements for operating system, screen resolution, browser, Flash, Windows Media Player, connection, and audio. The IRS is recommending that interested parties browse to http://www.visualwebcaster.com/event.asp?id=82090 from their computer ahead of time to be sure it meets minimum system requirements.

Webinar Archive Is Available on the IRS Video Portal

Interested viewers may view an archive of the webinar by clicking here.

October 28, 2011

Question of the Week: Do We Have to Report Health Insurance on Our W-2s?

Do We Have to Report Health Insurance on Our W-2s?
Do We Have to Report Health Insurance on Our W-2s?
This week’s question comes from Maria, an HR director.

Maria asks:

I keep hearing from our employees that we have to report the cost of health insurance on the Forms W-2 this year and that the employees will be taxed on it. Do we have to report health insurance on our W-2s?

Answer: As announced by the Internal Revenue Service in Notice 2010-69 and Notice 2011-28, reporting of the cost of health insurance has been postponed to at least 2012 for some employers and beyond that for the rest.

Notice 2010-69 Postponed Effective Date for All Employers

As previously reported, in Notice 2010-69 the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) postponed the requirement that health insurance be reported on Forms W-2. Originally, under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, reporting was to begin on the 2011 Forms W-2, which are distributed to employees in January 2012. In order “to provide employers with additional time to make any necessary changes to their payroll systems or procedures in preparation for compliance with the reporting requirement,” the IRS postponed the reporting requirement until the 2012 Forms W-2, which are distributed to employees in January 2013.

Notice 2011-28 Further Postponed Deadline for Many Employers

In Notice 2011-28, the IRS further postponed the deadline for employers who are required to file less than 250 Forms W-2. Employers who are required to file fewer than 250 Forms W-2 for calendar year 2011 will not be required to report health insurance on Form W-2 in 2012. Furthermore, until further guidance is issued by the IRS, any employer required to file fewer than 250 Forms W-2 in a calendar year will not be required to report the health insurance on Form W-2 for the following year.

Notice 2011-28 Does not Cause Excludable Employer-Provided Health Care Coverage to Become Taxable

According to Notice 2011-28, nothing in §6051(a)(14), Notice 2011-28, or the additional guidance that is contemplated under §6051(a)(14), causes or will cause otherwise excludable employer-provided health care coverage to become taxable.

Contact Vision Payroll Today

Contact Vision Payroll today if you have further questions on 2011 Form W-2 reporting for health coverage.

August 2, 2011

New York Issues Guidance on Withholding from Same-Sex Married Employees

NY Governor Andrew Cuomo
NY Governor Andrew Cuomo
Due to the recent enactment in New York of the Marriage Equality Act, The New York State Department of Taxation and Finance has updated information for same-sex married employees and their employers.

Employers Should Not Withhold on Certain Benefits

New York employers of same-sex married employees should institute the following changes:

  • Don’t withhold New York tax on certain benefits provided to a same-sex married employee. You don’t need to withhold tax for New York State, New York City, or Yonkers income tax purposes on the value of certain benefits (e.g., domestic partner health benefit), even though it’s subject to federal withholding. This applies if the employee’s federal taxable wages subject to withholding include the value of the benefits, and the value of these benefits wouldn’t be included in taxable wages if provided to a different-sex married spouse.
  • When reporting the annual wage totals on Form NYS-45, Quarterly Combined Withholding, Wage Reporting, and Unemployment Insurance Return, Part C, column d; report the federal wages minus any amount of benefits discussed above that you don’t withhold on for New York purposes (plus any amount of any taxable 414(h) retirement contributions and any IRC 125 amounts from a New York City flexible benefits program for governmental employees).
  • Continue to use the rules described in the NYS-50, Employer’s Guide to Unemployment Insurance, Wage Reporting, and Withholding Tax for reporting State and local wages on federal Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement.

Same-Sex Employees Should Consider Filing a New Form IT-2104

Same-sex employees should consider filing a new Form IT-2104, Employee’s Withholding Allowance Certificate, if they will be changing their filing status on their 2011 New York income tax return. They should also provide proof of a legal marriage to their employer so that the employer can stop withholding New York tax on the value of benefits subject to federal withholding that wouldn’t be subject to New York withholding, (e.g., domestic partner health benefit).

Contact Vision Payroll Today

Contact Vision Payroll if you have further questions on the changes in New York to withholding on same-sex married employees.

April 27, 2011

Tip of the Week: Notice 2011-28 Limits Which Employers Must Report Health Insurance

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , — Vision @ 5:04 pm
Notice 2011-28 Limits Which Employers Must Report Health Insurance
Notice 2011-28 Limits Which Employers Must Report Health Insurance
As previously reported, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has released Notice 2011-28, Interim Guidance on Informational Reporting to Employees of the Cost of Their Group Health Insurance Coverage.

Notice 2011-28 Applies To Large Employers

Notice 2011-28 exempts smaller employers from the reporting requirement. If an employer files fewer than 250 Forms W-2 for 2011, then the employer will be exempt from the reporting requirement for 2012 Forms W-2. Furthermore, until further guidance is issued by the IRS, such employers will continue to be exempt from the next year’s reporting requirements as long as they are required to file fewer than 250 Forms W-2 for a calendar year.

Further Guidance on Health Insurance Reporting on Form W-2 to Come

Over the coming months, Vision Payroll will provide further information on the interim guidance on informational reporting to employees of the cost of their group health insurance coverage as outlined in Notice 2011-28.

March 30, 2011

Tip of the Week: Guidance on Form W-2 Reporting for Health Coverage Issued

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , — Vision @ 6:11 pm
Guidance on Form W-2 Reporting for Health Coverage Issued
Guidance on Form W-2 Reporting for Health Coverage Issued
The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently released Notice 2011-28, Interim Guidance on Informational Reporting to Employees of the Cost of Their Group Health Insurance Coverage.

Notice 2011-28 Does not Cause Excludable Employer-Provided Health Care Coverage to Become Taxable

According to Notice 2011-28, nothing in §6051(a)(14), Notice 2011-28, or the additional guidance that is contemplated under §6051(a)(14), causes or will cause otherwise excludable employer-provided health care coverage to become taxable.

Notice 2011-28 Applies to 2012 Forms W-2

Notice 2011-28 applies to the 2012 Forms W-2, which will generally be furnished to employees during January 2013. Employers are not required to report the cost of excludable employer-provided health care coverage before the 2012 Forms W-2. The reporting will be in box 12 of 2012 Form W-2, using code DD.

Notice 2011-28 Contains Information on Calculating Reportable Amounts

Notice 2011-28 provides detailed information, in a question and answer format, on calculating reportable amounts, which amounts are included in the reportable amount, and which amounts are excluded from the reportable amount.

Contact Vision Payroll Today

Contact Vision Payroll today if you have further questions on changes to the 2012 Form W-2 reporting for health coverage.

February 8, 2011

Vermont Mandates Electronic Filing of Form W-2, Form 1099, and Form WH-434

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , , , — Vision @ 1:30 pm
Vermont Mandates Electronic Filing of Form W-2, Form 1099, and Form WH-434
Vermont Mandates Electronic Filing of Form W-2, Form 1099, and Form WH-434
The Vermont Commissioner of Taxes has mandated the electronic filing of Forms W-2 and 1099 and the accompanying Employers Annual Withholding Reconciliation (Form WH 434) beginning with the calendar year 2010 submissions.

This mandate is effective for:

  • Employers who will remit 25 or more W-2 and/or 1099 forms for 2010.
  • Payroll Filing Services and accountants who prepare W-2 forms and annual reconciliations for multiple taxpayers.

The Vermont Department of Taxes’ new online Electronic Filing Service for Form W-2, Form 1099, and Form WH-434 can be accessed here.

Electronic Filing Available Soon

This service will be available for use beginning in February 2011.

Contact Vision Payroll for Assistance

Contact Vision Payroll immediately for assistance in complying with the new Vermont electronic filing mandate.

January 28, 2011

Question of the Week: Why Don’t My Massachusetts Wages Equal My Federal Wages on My W-2?

Why Don’t My Massachusetts Wages Equal My Federal Wages on My W-2?
Why Don’t My Massachusetts Wages Equal My Federal Wages on My W-2?
This week’s question comes from Jordan, a company controller. For most employees in our company, the Massachusetts wages reported on the Form W-2 equal the federal wages on the Form W-2. My Massachusetts wages, however, are higher than my federal wages. Why don’t my Massachusetts wages equal my federal wages on my W-2? Answer: There may be several reasons why Massachusetts wages don’t equal federal wages on a Form W-2.

Differences Between Federal Wages and Massachusetts Wages on Form W-2

Although Massachusetts generally follows federal law on income taxation of wage benefits, certain items may increase or decrease Massachusetts wages as compared to federal wages. Among the differences are the following:

  1. Employee and employer contributions to Massachusetts governmental unit §414(h) retirement plans are taxable for Massachusetts purposes and not for federal purposes,
  2. The value of an employer-provided monthly transit pass in excess of $120 and not in excess of $230 per month is taxable for Massachusetts purposes and not for federal purposes,
  3. Imputed income from cost of health insurance coverage of former spouses and non-dependent children as required under Massachusetts law is taxable for federal purposes and not for Massachusetts purposes (prior to the change included in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act),
  4. Employee contributions to cafeteria plans for the benefit of a same-sex spouse and that spouse’s children when the same-sex spouse or that spouse’s children do not qualify as a dependent of the employee are taxable for federal purposes and not for Massachusetts purposes,
  5. Qualified tuition reduction that an educational organization provides to the same-sex spouse of an employee is taxable for federal purposes and not for Massachusetts purposes, and
  6. Employer contributions to an accident or health insurance plan for the benefit of a same-sex spouse and that spouse’s children when the same-sex spouse or that spouse’s children do not qualify as a dependent of the employee are taxable for federal purposes and not for Massachusetts purposes.

Contact Vision Payroll Now

Contact Vision Payroll if you have further questions on the differences between federal wages and Massachusetts wages on Form W-2.

January 25, 2011

2010 Form W-2 Tips, Part 16, Boxes 15 through 20, State and Local Income Tax Information

Filed under: News — Tags: , , , , , , , , — Vision @ 4:34 pm

This is the last in a continuing series on the 2010 Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, which employers must generally furnish to employees no later than January 31, 2011. Forms mailed on the due date are considered furnished if properly addressed. Employers unable to meet that deadline may file a request for extension of time to furnish the forms. Today we review Boxes 15 through 20, state and local income tax information.

Two States May Be Reported on Each Individual Form

Employers report state and local tax information in boxes 15 through 20. There is room for two states on each individual form with one state reported above the broken line and one state reported below the broken line. You should report local information in the same manner. If you must report information for more than two states or localities, use a second form. Do not complete federal information on any additional form for the same employee unless it is information that couldn’t fit on the first form or is being reported separately. For the state name, use the two-character abbreviation assigned by the United States Postal Service. The state taxing authority should have assigned the employer’s state ID number to use.

State Wage Reporting Should Follow Rules of That State

State wages reported in box 16 and local wages in box 18 must be reported according to the reporting requirements of the state or locality and may or may not equal wages reported in box 1, box 3, or box 7.

Final Installment in Series on 2010 Form W-2

Although this ends this series on the 2010 Form W-2, Vision Payroll will continue to provide information throughout the year to assist you in the process of gathering data to help ensure an accurate and efficient 2011 year-end reporting season. Contact Vision Payroll with any questions on the 2010 Form W-2.

January 24, 2011

2010 Form W-2 Tips, Part 15, Box 14 Other

This is one in a continuing series on the 2010 Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, which employers must generally furnish to employees no later than January 31, 2011. Forms mailed on the due date are considered furnished if properly addressed. Employers unable to meet that deadline may file a request for extension of time to furnish the forms. Today we review Box 14, other.

Use Box 14 to Provide Additional Inforamtion

Box 14 is used to provide additional information that employees may want or need for their tax records. Employers must report the lease value of a vehicle reported in box 1 either here or in a separate statement provided to the employee. The following are examples of items that employers may want to disclose in box 14:

  • State disability insurance taxes withheld
  • Union dues
  • Uniform payments
  • Health insurance premiums deducted
  • Nontaxable income
  • Educational assistance payments
  • Clergy’s parsonage allowance and utilities
  • Nonelective employer contributions to a pension plan on behalf of an employee
  • Voluntary after-tax contributions to a pension plan that are deducted from an employee’s pay (not including Roth contributions)
  • Required employee contributions to a pension plan
  • Employer matching contributions to a pension plan

USERRA Reporting for Makeup Amounts Is Done in Box 14

Employers may also report prior-year makeup amounts for nonelective employer contributions, voluntary after-tax contributions, required employee contributions, and employer matching contributions made under the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act of 1994, also known as USERRA. Such amounts should be reported separately for each year.

Label Amounts in Box 14

Amounts included in box 14 should include a separate label for each item.

Boxes 15 Through 20, State and Local income Tax Information Is the Next Topic

The next topic in this continuing series will be Boxes 15 through 20, state and local income tax information. Contact Vision Payroll with any questions on the 2010 Form W-2.

January 23, 2011

2010 Form W-2 Tips, Part 14, Box 13 Checkboxes

This is one in a continuing series on the 2010 Form W-2, Wage and Tax Statement, which employers must generally furnish to employees no later than January 31, 2011. Forms mailed on the due date are considered furnished if properly addressed. Employers unable to meet that deadline may file a request for extension of time to furnish the forms. Today we review Box 13, checkboxes.

First Checkbox Is for Statutory Employees

Three checkboxes must be completed in certain circumstances. First is a checkbox for statutory employees. Statutory employees are independent contractors who are legally classified as employees for certain purposes. Employers must withhold social security tax and Medicare tax from statutory employees. Employers do not withhold federal income tax from statutory employees.

Second Checkbox Is for Retirement Plan Participation

The second checkbox is for retirement plan participation. Employers must check the box for active participants in certain retirement plans. Generally, employees are active participants in defined benefit plans if they are eligible to participate for that tax year. Employees are generally active participants in defined contribution plans for any tax year that either the employer or employee makes a contribution, including forfeitures added to the employee’s account.

Third Checkbox Is for Third-Party Sick Pay

The final checkbox is for third-party sick pay. This box is used either by payers of third-party sick pay filing on behalf of an insured or by employer’s reporting payments made by the insurer.

Deceased Employee Checkbox Has Been Eliminated

The checkbox for deceased employees was eliminated after the year 2000 reporting period and is no longer required.

Box 14, Other Is the Next Topic

The next topic in this continuing series will be Box 14, other. Contact Vision Payroll with any questions on the 2010 Form W-2.

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