Vision Payroll

July 4, 2012

Tip of the Week: The NLRB’s Social Media Policy Memorandum

The NLRB’s Social Media Policy Memorandum
The NLRB’s Social Media Policy Memorandum
On May 30, 2012, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) Acting General Counsel Lafe Solomon issued a memorandum regarding social media policies in the workplace. The General Counsel’s memorandum is applicable to both unionized and non-unionized work environments.

Certain Employees Rights Are Granted Under Section 7 of the NLRA

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) allows employees the right to form, join, or assist labor organizations and the right to engage in other concerted activities for the purpose of collective bargaining or other mutual aid or protection. In addition, even in union-free businesses, employee complaints about hours, pay, treatment, working conditions, etc. may not result in disciplinary action or termination under the NLRA. This section of the Act has important implications for employer social media policies, as delineated in the NLRB’s recent memo.

Social Media Policies That Might Be Illegal

The NLRB’s memo covered seven social media policies published by various employers to demonstrate specific provisions that may be unlawful. Some of those social media policies include the following:

  • Policies concerning an employer’s attempt to protect confidential information may be unlawful.
  • Policies that aim to show peaceful relations amongst staff may be unlawful.
  • Policies about employer image protections may be unlawful.

Companies Must Establish a Compliant Social Media Policy

To learn more about establishing a compliant social media policy, be sure to read the featured article by the HR pros at MyHRSupportCenter, The NLRB’s Social Media Policy Memorandum. If you’re not yet signed up or would like a free trial of MyHRSupportCenter, contact Vision Payroll today.

October 12, 2011

Tip of the Week: Employee Rights Notice Posting Requirement Delayed to 2012

New NLRB Notice Requirement Puts Businesses Nationwide on NoticeAs previously announced, The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a final rule requiring most private-sector employers to notify employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRB will require employers to post a new NLRA notice in the workplace.

Posting Deadline Extended to 2012

The NLRB recently extended the deadline from November 14, 2011 to January 31, 2012.

Be Protected Against Claims of Unfair Labor Practices

Join the Vision Payroll Poster Program today and receive a guarantee worth up to $25,000* against any government fine for a posting violation. You’ll receive a new version of our space-saving, full-color laminated posters as laws change. No hassle, no uncertainty, no research. Let Vision Payroll keep track of the changes and make sure you stay in compliance. Sign up TODAY!

*Our Poster Subscription Programs guarantee that you will have the most up to date State and Federal Labor Law posters. During the duration of your subscription, if you receive a posting violation while properly displaying the most current version of our posters, Elite Business Ventures will pay any fine imposed by a government agency, with the maximum amount of $25,000 due to improper content.

October 5, 2011

Tip of the Week: New NLRB Notice Requirement Puts Businesses Nationwide on Notice

New NLRB Notice Requirement Puts Businesses Nationwide on NoticeThe National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a final rule requiring most private-sector employers to notify employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRB will require employers to post a new NLRA notice in the workplace. The posting requirement, originally was to be effective November 14, 2011, but has been extended to January 31, 2012.

Learn Who Is and Isn’t Covered and More

Not all employers are covered by the new mandate, including federal and state governments and labor unions. Employers who are covered must be sure to post in a conspicuous area. Additional requirements may apply to workplaces with large numbers of employees who don’t speak English. An electronic posting of the notice may also be required.

Learn More About the New NLRB Notice Requirement

To get more details about the new NLRB notice requirement, be sure to read the featured article by the HR pros at MyHRSupportCenter, New NLRB Notice Requirement Puts Businesses Nationwide on Notice. If you’re not yet signed up or would like a free trial of MyHRSupportCenter, contact Vision Payroll today.

Be Protected Against Claims of Unfair Labor Practices

Join the Vision Payroll Poster Program today and receive a guarantee worth up to $25,000* against any government fine for a posting violation. You’ll receive a new version of our space-saving, full-color laminated posters as laws change. No hassle, no uncertainty, no research. Let Vision Payroll keep track of the changes and make sure you stay in compliance. Sign up TODAY!

*Our Poster Subscription Programs guarantee that you will have the most up to date State and Federal Labor Law posters. During the duration of your subscription, if you receive a posting violation while properly displaying the most current version of our posters, Elite Business Ventures will pay any fine imposed by a government agency, with the maximum amount of $25,000 due to improper content.

September 16, 2011

Question of the Week: If We Don’t Have Employees Who Are Union Members, Do We Need to Post the Employee Rights Notice Posting?

If We Don’t Have Employees Who Are Union Members, Do We Need to Post the Employee Rights Notice Posting?This week’s question comes from Carl, a company owner.

Carl asks…

I heard there is a new poster about union rights. Our workplace is nonunion. If we don’t have employees who are union members, do we need to post the employee rights notice posting?

Answer: Employers with and without union workforces are required to post the notice because NLRA rights apply to union and non-union workplaces.

Posting Requirement to Begin November 14

As of November 14, 2011, most private sector employers are required to post a notice advising employees of their rights under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The 11-by-17-inch notice should be posted in a conspicuous place, where other notifications of workplace rights and employer rules and policies are posted.

Failing to Post May Be Considered an Unfair Labor Practice

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) does not audit workplaces or initiate enforcement actions on its own. A failure to post the Notice would need to be brought to the NLRB’s attention in the form of an unfair labor practice charge by employees, unions, or other persons. In most cases, the NLRB expects that employers who fail to post the Notice were unaware of the rule and will comply when requested by a NLRB agent. In such cases, the unfair labor practice case will typically be closed without further action. The NLRB also may extend the 6-month statute of limitations for filing a charge involving other unfair labor practice allegations against the employer.

If an employer knowingly and willfully fails to post the Notice, that failure may be considered evidence of unlawful motive in an unfair labor practice case involving other alleged violations of the NLRA.

Be Protected Against Claims of Unfair Labor Practices

Join the Vision Payroll Poster Program today and receive a guarantee worth up to $25,000* against any government fine for a posting violation. You’ll receive a new version of our space-saving, full-color laminated posters as laws change. No hassle, no uncertainty, no research. Let Vision Payroll keep track of the changes and make sure you stay in compliance. Sign up TODAY!

*Our Poster Subscription Programs guarantee that you will have the most up to date State and Federal Labor Law posters. During the duration of your subscription, if you receive a posting violation while properly displaying the most current version of our posters, Elite Business Ventures will pay any fine imposed by a government agency, with the maximum amount of $25,000 due to improper content.

August 17, 2011

Tip of the Week: Unfair Labor Practices in the Private Sector

Unfair Labor Practices in the Private Sector
Unfair Labor Practices in the Private Sector
Some employers in the private sector hear the concept of “unfair labor practices” and think it applies to employees represented by labor unions. However, unfair labor practices essentially include employer or union violations of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

What Is an Unfair Labor Practice?

Actions considered unfair labor practices include the following:

  • Coercing workers not to join unions;
  • Threatening to close a worksite or plant if workers decide to join or form a union;
  • Promising extras to employees if they don’t join the union; and
  • Forcing workers to quit because of legitimate union activities.

Get More Details on Unfair Labor Practices in the Private Sector

To learn more details about each of these unfair labor practices, be sure to listen to Unfair Labor Practices in the Private Sector in this month’s HRCast, a recording provided by our team of HR Pros and available exclusively on MyHRSupportCenter.

MyHRSupportCenter Provides Alerts, Best Practices, and HR Tools Every Day

Visit MyHRSupportCenter regularly, not only for our HRCasts, but also to get late-breaking compliance alerts, best practices to implement, and HR tools to use every day. If you haven’t yet signed up and would like a free trial of MyHRSupportCenter, contact Vision Payroll today.

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