Vision Payroll

July 6, 2012

Unemployment Rate Steady at 8.2 Percent in June

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Unemployment Rate Steady at 8.2 Percent in June
Unemployment Rate Steady at 8.2 Percent in June
Nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000), and the unemployment rate was unchanged at 8.2%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Professional and business services added jobs, and employment in other major industries changed little over the month.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons (12.7 million) was essentially unchanged in June, and the unemployment rate held at 8.2%.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate for blacks (14.4%) edged up over the month, while the rates for adult men (7.8%), adult women (7.4%), teenagers (23.7%), whites (7.4%), and Hispanics (11.0%) showed little or no change. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.3% in June (not seasonally adjusted), little changed from a year earlier.

In June, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was essentially unchanged at 5.4 million. These individuals accounted for 41.9% of the unemployed.

Both the civilian labor force participation rate and the employment-population ratio were unchanged in June at 63.8 and 58.6%, respectively.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 8.2 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

In June, 2.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, down from 2.7 million a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 821,000 discouraged workers in June, a decline of 161,000 from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in June had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment continued to edge up in June (+80,000). In the second quarter, employment growth averaged 75,000 per month, compared with an average monthly gain of 226,000 for the first quarter of the year. Slower job growth in the second quarter occurred in most major industries.

Professional and business services added 47,000 jobs in June, with temporary help services accounting for 25,000 of the increase. Employment also rose in management and technical consulting services (+9,000) and in computer systems design and related services (+7,000). Employment in professional and business services has grown by 1.5 million since its most recent low point in September 2009.

Employment in manufacturing continued to edge up in June (+11,000). Growth in the second quarter averaged 10,000 per month, compared with an average of 41,000 per month during the first quarter. In June, employment increased in motor vehicles and parts (+7,000) and in fabricated metal products (+5,000).

Employment continued to trend up in health care (+13,000) and wholesale trade (+9,000) in June.

Employment in other major industries, including mining and logging, construction, retail trade, transportation and warehousing, financial activities, leisure and hospitality, and government, showed little or no change.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 34.5 hours in June. The manufacturing workweek edged up by 0.1 hour to 40.7 hours, and factory overtime was 3.3 hours for the fifth consecutive month. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 33.8 hours.

In June, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 6 cents to $23.50. Over the year, average hourly earnings have increased by 2.0%. In June, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 5 cents to $19.74.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for April was revised from +77,000 to +68,000, and the change for May was revised from +69,000 to +77,000.

November 4, 2011

Unemployment Rate Fell To 9.0 Percent in October

Filed under: News — Tags: , , — Vision @ 2:49 pm

Nonfarm payroll employment continued to trend up in October (+80,000), and the unemployment rate was little changed at 9.0%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment in the private sector rose, with modest job growth continuing in professional and businesses services, leisure and hospitality, health care, and mining. Government employment continued to trend down.

Household Survey Data

Both the number of unemployed persons (13.9 million) and the unemployment rate (9.0%) changed little over the month. The unemployment rate has remained in a narrow range from 9.0 to 9.2% since April.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rate declined for blacks (15.1%) in October, while the rates for adult men (8.8%), adult women (8.0%), teenagers (24.1%), whites (8.0%), and Hispanics (11.4%) showed little or no change. The jobless rate for Asians was 7.3%, not seasonally adjusted.

In October, the number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) declined by 366,000 to 5.9 million, or 42.4% of total unemployment.

The civilian labor force participation rate remained at 64.2% in October, and the employment-population ratio was little changed at 58.4%.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) decreased by 374,000 to 8.9 million in October. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

In October, 2.6 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, about the same as a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 967,000 discouraged workers in October, a decrease of 252,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.6 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in October had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment continued to trend up in October (+80,000). Over the past 12 months, payroll employment has increased by an average of 125,000 per month. In October, private sector employment increased by 104,000, with continued job growth in professional and business services, leisure and hospitality, health care, and mining. Government employment continued to contract in October.

Employment in professional and business services continued to trend up in October (+32,000) and has grown by 562,000 over the past 12 months. Within the industry, there have been modest job gains in recent months in temporary help services and in management and technical consulting services.

Employment in leisure and hospitality edged up over the month (+22,000). Since a recent low point in January 2010, the industry has added 344,000 jobs.

Health care employment continued to expand in October 2011 (+12,000), following a gain of 45,000 in September. Offices of physicians added 8,000 jobs in October. Over the past 12 months, health care has added 313,000 jobs.

In October, mining employment continued to increase (+6,000); oil and gas extraction accounted for half of the increase. Since a recent low point in October 2009, mining employment has risen by 152,000.

Manufacturing employment changed little in October 2011 (+5,000) and has remained flat for 3 months. In October, a job gain in transportation equipment (+10,000) was partly offset by small losses in other manufacturing industries.

Within retail trade, employment increased in general merchandise stores (+10,000) and in motor vehicle and parts dealers (+6,000) in October. Retail trade has added 156,000 jobs over the past 12 months.

Construction employment declined by 20,000 in October, largely offsetting an increase of 27,000 in September; both over-the-month changes largely occurred in nonresidential construction. Employment in both residential and nonresidential construction has shown little net change in 2011.

Employment in other major private-sector industries, including wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, information, and financial activities, changed little in October.

Government employment continued to trend down over the month (-24,000), with most of the October decline in the non-educational component of state government. Employment in both state government and local government has been trending down since the second half of 2008.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged at 34.3 hours in October. The manufacturing workweek rose by 0.2 hour to 40.5 hours, and factory overtime remained at 3.2 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 33.7 hours in October.

In October, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 5 cents, or 0.2%, to $23.19. This increase followed a gain of 6 cents in September. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 1.8%. In October, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 3 cents, or 0.2%, to $19.53.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for August was revised from +57,000 to +104,000, and the change for September was revised from +103,000 to +158,000.

October 7, 2011

Unemployment Rate Steady at 9.1 Percent in September

Unemployment Rate Steady at 9.1 Percent in September
Unemployment Rate Steady at 9.1 Percent in September
Nonfarm payroll employment edged up by 103,000 in September, and the unemployment rate held at 9.1%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. The increase in employment partially reflected the return to payrolls of about 45,000 telecommunications workers who had been on strike in August. In September, job gains occurred in professional and business services, health care, and construction. Government employment continued to trend down.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons, at 14.0 million, was essentially unchanged in September, and the unemployment rate was 9.1%. Since April, the rate has held in a narrow range from 9.0 to 9.2%

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (8.8%), adult women (8.1%), teenagers (24.6%), whites (8.0%), blacks (16.0%), and Hispanics (11.3%) showed little or no change in September. The jobless rate for Asians was 7.8%, not seasonally adjusted.

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was 6.2 million in September. These individuals accounted for 44.6% of the unemployed.

Both the labor force and employment increased in September. However, the civilian labor force participation rate, at 64.2%, and the employment-population ratio, at 58.3%, were little changed.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) rose to 9.3 million in September. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

In September, about 2.5 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, about the same as a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 1.0 million discouraged workers in September, down by 172,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.5 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in September had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment edged up by 103,000 in September. Since April, payroll employment has increased by an average of 72,000 per month, compared with an average of 161,000 for the prior 7 months. In September, job gains occurred in professional and business services, health care, and construction. Government employment continued to trend down.

Employment in professional and business services increased by 48,000 over the month and has grown by 897,000 since a recent low in September 2009. Employment in temporary help services edged up in September; this industry has added 53,000 jobs over the past 3 months. In September, employment growth continued in computer systems design and in management and technical consulting services.

Health care employment continued to expand in September, with an increase of 44,000. Within the industry, job gains occurred in ambulatory health care services (+26,000) and in hospitals (+13,000).

Construction employment increased by 26,000 over the month, after showing little movement since February. The over-the-month gain was due to employment increases in the nonresidential construction industries, which includes heavy and civil construction. Mining employment continued to trend up in September.

Employment in information was up by 34,000 over the month due to the return of about 45,000 telecommunications workers to payrolls after an August strike.

Manufacturing employment changed little in September (-13,000) and has been essentially flat for the past 2 months.

Within retail trade, employment declined in electronic and appliance stores (-9,000) in September. Employment in wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing, financial activities, and leisure and hospitality changed little.

Government employment continued to trend down over the month (-34,000). The U.S. Postal Service continued to lose jobs (-5,000). Local government employment declined by 35,000 and has fallen by 535,000 since September 2008.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour over the month to 34.3 hours following a decrease of 0.1 hour in August. The manufacturing workweek edged down by 0.1 hour in September to 40.2 hours. Factory overtime increased by 0.1 hour to 3.2 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged up by 0.1 hour to 33.6 hours in September.

In September, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 4 cents, or 0.2%, to $23.12. This increase followed a decline of 4 cents in August. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 1.9%. In September, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 3 cents, or 0.2%, to $19.52.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for July was revised from +85,000 to +127,000, and the change for August was revised from 0 to +57,000.

October 2, 2011

New England Unemployment Rate Drops To 7.8 Percent in August

Keith Hall, Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
Keith Hall, Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
The New England unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 7.8% in August, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported recently. Regional Commissioner Denis M. McSweeney noted that the over-the-year change in New England’s unemployment rate was not statistically significant. The national jobless rate was unchanged at 9.1%, but was 0.5 percentage point lower than a year earlier.

Pacific Division Continues to Report Highest Rate

New England is one of nine geographic divisions nationwide. Among the nine divisions, the Pacific continued to report the highest unemployment rate, 11.2% in August. The West North Central again registered the lowest rate, 6.9%. Over the month, the East North Central was the only division to experience a statistically significant unemployment rate change (+0.2 percentage point). The East North Central also recorded the only significant rate change among divisions over the year (-0.6 percentage point).

Four New England States Have Significantly Lower Rates than Rest of Nation

In August, five of the six New England states posted jobless rates that were significantly different from that of the United States. New Hampshire (5.3%), Vermont (5.9%), Massachusetts (7.4%), and Maine (7.6%) recorded lower-than-average unemployment rates and were among 25 states in the country to do so. In fact, New Hampshire reported the fourth-lowest jobless rate nationwide. In contrast, Rhode Island (10.6%) had the highest jobless rate among the New England states and was among eight states and the District of Columbia with rates significantly higher than the national average. Connecticut was among the 17 remaining states that registered unemployment rates that were not appreciably different from that of the nation.

No New England State Had a Significant Rate Increase in August

In August, seven states and the District of Columbia posted statistically significant rate increases from July. The six New England states were among the 43 remaining states that registered jobless rates that were not measurably different from those of a month earlier, though some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant changes.

Most States Had Minimal Change over the Last Year

Over the year, five states recorded statistically significant unemployment decreases. The District of Columbia posted the only significant rate increase from a year earlier (+1.3 percentage points). The six New England states were among the 45 states that registered jobless rates not appreciably different from those of a year earlier.

September 2, 2011

Unemployment Rate Steady at 9.1 Percent in August

Unemployment Rate Steady at 9.1 Percent in August
Unemployment Rate Steady at 9.1 Percent in August
Nonfarm payroll employment was unchanged in August, and the unemployment rate held at 9.1%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Employment in most major industries changed little over the month. Health care continued to add jobs, and a decline in information employment reflected a strike. Government employment continued to trend down, despite the return of workers from a partial government shutdown in Minnesota.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons, at 14.0 million, was essentially unchanged in August, and the unemployment rate held at 9.1%. The rate has shown little change since April.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (8.9%), adult women (8.0%), teenagers (25.4%), whites (8.0%), blacks (16.7%), and Hispanics (11.3%) showed little or no change in August. The jobless rate for Asians was 7.1%, not seasonally adjusted.

The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was about unchanged at 6.0 million in August and accounted for 42.9% of the unemployed.

The labor force rose to 153.6 million in August. Both the civilian labor force participation rate, at 64.0%, and the employment-population ratio, at 58.2%, were little changed.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) rose from 8.4 million to 8.8 million in August. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

About 2.6 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force in August, up from 2.4 million a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 977,000 discouraged workers in August, down by 133,000 from a year earlier. (The data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.6 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in August had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment, at 131.1 million, was unchanged  in August. Employment changed little in most major private-sector industries.

Health care employment rose by 30,000 in August. Ambulatory health care services and hospitals added 18,000 and 8,000 jobs, respectively. Over the past 12 months, health care employment has grown by 306,000.

Employment in mining continued to trend up in August (+6,000). Since reaching a trough in October 2009, employment in mining has risen by 144,000, with mining support activities accounting for most of the gain.

Within professional and business services, computer systems design and related services added 8,000 jobs in August. Employment in temporary help services changed little over the month (+5,000) and has shown little movement on net so far this year.

Employment in the information industry declined by 48,000 in August. About 45,000 workers in the telecommunications industry were on strike and thus off company payrolls during the survey reference period.

Manufacturing employment was essentially unchanged in August (-3,000), following a gain of 36,000 in July. For the past 4 months, manufacturing has added an average of 14,000 jobs per month, compared with an average of 35,000 jobs per month in the first 4 months of the year.

Elsewhere in the private sector, employment in construction; trade, transportation, and utilities; financial activities; and leisure and hospitality changed little over the month.

Government employment continued to trend down over the month (-17,000). Despite the return of about 22,000 workers from a partial government shutdown in Minnesota, employment in state government changed little in August (+5,000). Employment in local government continued to decline. Since employment peaked in September 2008, local government has lost 550,000 jobs.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged down by 0.1 hour over the month to 34.2 hours. The manufacturing workweek was 40.3 hours for the third consecutive month; factory overtime increased by 0.1 hour over the month to 3.2 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls edged down to 33.5 hours in August, after holding at 33.6 hours for the prior 6 months.

In August, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 3 cents, or 0.1%, to $23.09. This decline followed an 11-cent gain in July. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 1.9%. In August, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees decreased by 2 cents, or 0.1%, to $19.47.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for June was revised from +46,000 to +20,000, and the change for July was revised from +117,000 to +85,000.

August 30, 2011

New England Unemployment Rate Jumps To 7.9 Percent in July

Keith Hall, Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
Keith Hall, Commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics
The New England unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 7.9% in July, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Regional Commissioner Denis M. McSweeney noted that the over-the-year change in New England’s unemployment rate was not statistically significant. The national jobless rate was little changed at 9.1%, but was 0.4 percentage point lower than a year earlier.

Pacific Division Reported Highest Rate

New England is one of nine geographic divisions nationwide. Among the nine divisions, the Pacific continued to report the highest unemployment rate, 11.2% in July. The West North Central again registered the lowest rate, 6.8%. Over the month, two divisions experienced statistically significant unemployment rate changes: the East North Central (+0.3 percentage point) and Pacific (+0.2 point). Over the year, the East North Central recorded the only significant rate change among divisions (-1.0 percentage point).

Five New England States Have Significantly Lower Rates than Rest of Nation

In July, five of the six New England states posted jobless rates that were significantly different from that of the United States. New Hampshire (5.2%), Vermont (5.7%), Massachusetts (7.6%), and Maine (7.7%) recorded lower-than-average unemployment rates and were among 25 states in the country to do so. In fact, New Hampshire reported the fourth-lowest jobless rate nationwide. In contrast, Rhode Island (10.8%) had the highest jobless rate among the New England states and the fifth-highest jobless rate in the nation. Rhode Island was among eight states and the District of Columbia that had unemployment rates significantly higher than the national average. Connecticut was among the 17 remaining states in recording unemployment rates not appreciably different from that for the nation.

New Hampshire Has Significant Rate Increase in July

In July, New Hampshire was the only New England state and one of 10 states nationwide to report a statistically significant unemployment rate change from June (+0.3 percentage point). The District of Columbia also experienced a significant over-the-month rate increase (+0.4 percentage point). The remaining five New England states were among the 40 states that registered jobless rates that were not measurably different from those of a month earlier, though some had changes that were at least as large numerically as the significant changes.

Most States Have Minimal Change over the Last Year

Over the year, 11 states recorded statistically significant unemployment rate changes, all decreases. The six New England states were among the 39 states and the District of Columbia that registered jobless rates not appreciably different from those of a year earlier.

August 5, 2011

Unemployment Rate Fell to 9.1 Percent in July

Filed under: News — Tags: , , — Vision @ 12:14 pm

Unemployment Rate Fell to 9.1 Percent in July
Unemployment Rate Fell to 9.1 Percent in July
Total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 117,000 in July, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 9.1%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Job gains occurred in health care, retail trade, manufacturing, and mining. Government employment continued to trend down.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons (13.9 million) and the unemployment rate (9.1%) changed little in July. Since April, the unemployment rate has shown little definitive movement. The labor force, at 153.2 million, was little changed in July.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (9.0%), adult women (7.9%), teenagers (25.0%), whites (8.1%), blacks (15.9%), and Hispanics (11.3 percent) showed little or no change in July. The jobless rate for Asians was 7.7%, not seasonally adjusted.

The number of persons unemployed for less than 5 weeks declined by 387,000 in July, mostly offsetting an increase in the prior month. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over), at 6.2 million, changed little over the month and accounted for 44.4% of the unemployed.

The civilian labor force participation rate edged down in July to 63.9%, and the employment population ratio was little changed at 58.1%.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was about unchanged in July at 8.4 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

In July, 2.8 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, little changed from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 1.1 million discouraged workers in July, about the same as a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in July had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment increased by 117,000 in July, following little growth over the prior 2 months. Total private employment rose by 154,000 over the month, reflecting job gains in several major industries, including health care, retail trade, manufacturing, and mining. Government employment continued to decline.

Health care employment grew by 31,000 in July. Ambulatory health care services and hospitals each added 14,000 jobs over the month. Over the past 12 months, health care employment has grown by 299,000.

Retail trade added 26,000 jobs in July. Employment in health and personal care stores rose by 9,000 over the month with small increases distributed among several other retail industries. Employment in retail trade has increased by 228,000 since a recent low in December 2009.

Manufacturing employment increased in July (+24,000); nearly all of the increase was in durable goods manufacturing. Within durable goods, the motor vehicles and parts industry had fewer seasonal layoffs than typical for July, contributing to a seasonally adjusted employment increase of 12,000.

Manufacturing has added 289,000 jobs since its most recent trough in December 2009, and durable goods manufacturing added 327,000 jobs during this period.

In July, employment in mining rose by 9,000; virtually all of the gain (+8,000) occurred in support activities for mining. Employment in mining has increased by 140,000 since a recent low in October 2009.

Employment in professional and technical services continued to trend up in July (+18,000). This industry has added 246,000 jobs since a recent low in March 2010. Employment in temporary help services changed little over the month and has shown little movement on net so far this year.

Elsewhere in the private sector, employment in construction, transportation and warehousing, information, financial activities, and leisure and hospitality changed little over the month.

Government employment continued to trend down over the month (-37,000). Employment in state government decreased by 23,000, almost entirely due to a partial shutdown of the Minnesota state government. Employment in local government continued to wane over the month.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls was unchanged over the month at 34.3 hours. The manufacturing workweek and factory overtime for all employees also were unchanged at 40.3 hours and 3.1 hours, respectively. In July, the average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls was 33.6 hours for the sixth consecutive month.

In July, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls increased by 10 cents, or 0.4%, to $23.13. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 2.3%. In July, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees increased by 8 cents, or 0.4%, to $19.52.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for May was revised from +25,000 to +53,000, and the change for June was revised from +18,000 to +46,000.

July 9, 2011

Unemployment Rate Rose To 9.2 Percent in June

Filed under: News — Tags: , , — Vision @ 5:41 pm

Unemployment Rate Rose To 9.2% in June
Unemployment Rate Rose To 9.2% in June
Nonfarm payroll employment was essentially unchanged in June (+18,000), and the unemployment rate was little changed at 9.2%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported recently. Employment in most major private-sector industries changed little over the month. Government employment continued to trend down.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons (14.1 million) and the unemployment rate (9.2%) were essentially unchanged over the month. Since March, the number of unemployed persons has increased by 545,000, and the unemployment rate has risen by 0.4 percentage points. The labor force, at 153.4 million, changed little over the month.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (9.1%), adult women (8.0%), teenagers (24.5%), whites (8.1%), blacks (16.2%), and Hispanics (11.6 percent) showed little or no change in June. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.8%, not seasonally adjusted.

The number of persons unemployed for less than 5 weeks increased by 412,000 in June. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks and over) was essentially unchanged over the month, at 6.3 million, and accounted for 44.4% of the unemployed.

The civilian labor force participation rate was little changed in June at 64.1%. The employment-population ratio decreased by 0.2 percentage point to 58.2%.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged in June at 8.6 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

In June, 2.7 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, about the same as a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 982,000 discouraged workers in June, down by 225,000 from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in June had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

Establishment Survey Data

Total nonfarm payroll employment was essentially unchanged in June (+18,000). Following gains averaging 215,000 per month from February through April, employment has been essentially flat for the past 2 months. Employment in most major private-sector industries changed little in June, while government employment continued to trend down.

Within professional and business services, employment in professional and technical services increased in June (+24,000). This industry has added 245,000 jobs since a recent low in March 2010. Employment in temporary help services changed little over the month and has shown little movement on net so far this year.

Health care employment continued to trend up in June (+14,000), with the largest gain in ambulatory health care services. Over the prior 12 months, health care had added an average of 24,000 jobs per month.

In June, employment in mining rose by 8,000, with most of the gain occurring in support activities for mining. Employment in mining has increased by 128,000 since a recent low in October 2009.

Employment in leisure and hospitality edged up (+34,000) in June and has grown by 279,000 since a recent low in January 2010.

Employment in government continued to trend down over the month (-39,000). Federal employment declined by 14,000 in June. Employment in both state government and local government continued to trend down over the month and has been falling since the second half of 2008.

Manufacturing employment changed little in June. Following gains totaling 164,000 between November 2010 and April 2011, employment in this industry has been flat for the past 2 months. In June, job gains in fabricated metal products (+8,000) were partially offset by a loss in wood products (-5,000).

Construction employment was essentially unchanged in June. After having fallen sharply during the 2007-09 period, employment in construction has shown little movement on net since early 2010.

The average workweek for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 0.1 hour to 34.3 hours in June. The manufacturing workweek for all employees decreased by 0.3 hour to 40.3 hours over the month; factory overtime edged down by 0.1 hour to 3.1 hours. The average workweek for production and nonsupervisory employees on private nonfarm payrolls remained at 33.6 hours in June.

In June, average hourly earnings for all employees on private nonfarm payrolls decreased by 1 cent to $22.99. Over the past 12 months, average hourly earnings have increased by 1.9%. In June, average hourly earnings of private-sector production and nonsupervisory employees declined by 1 cent to $19.41.

The change in total nonfarm payroll employment for April was revised from +232,000 to +217,000, and the change for May was revised from +54,000 to +25,000.

April 2, 2011

Unemployment Rate Fell to 8.8 Percent in March

Filed under: News — Tags: , , — Vision @ 3:19 pm

Unemployment Rate Fell to 8.8% in March
Unemployment Rate Fell to 8.8% in March
Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 216,000 in March, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 8.8%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported recently. Job gains occurred in professional and business services, health care, leisure and hospitality, and mining. Employment in manufacturing continued to trend up.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons (13.5 million) and the unemployment rate (8.8%) changed little in March. The labor force also was little changed over the month. Since November 2010, the jobless rate has declined by 1.0 percentage point.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (8.6%), adult women (7.7%), teenagers (24.5%), whites (7.9%), blacks (15.5%), and Hispanics (11.3%) showed little change in March. The jobless rate for Asians was 7.1%, not seasonally adjusted.

The number of job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs, at 8.2 million, was little changed in March but has fallen by 1.3 million since November 2010. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was 6.1 million in March; their share of the unemployed increased from 43.9% to 45.5% over the month.

In March, the civilian labor force participation rate held at 64.2%, and the employment population ratio, at 58.5%, changed little.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was little changed in March, at 8.4 million. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

In March, 2.4 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, up slightly from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 921,000 discouraged workers in March, little changed from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.5 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in March had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

March 5, 2011

Unemployment Rate Fell to 8.9 Percent in February

Filed under: News — Tags: , , — Vision @ 8:02 pm

Unemployment Rate Fell to 8.9 Percent in February
Unemployment Rate Fell to 8.9 Percent in February
Nonfarm payroll employment increased by 192,000 in February, and the unemployment rate was little changed at 8.9%, the US Bureau of Labor Statistics reported recently. Job gains occurred in manufacturing, construction, professional and business services, health care, and transportation and warehousing.

Household Survey Data

The number of unemployed persons (13.7 million) and the unemployment rate (8.9%) changed little in February. The labor force was about unchanged over the month. The jobless rate was down by 0.9 percentage points since November 2010.

Among the major worker groups, the unemployment rates for adult men (8.7%), adult women (8.0%), teenagers (23.9%), whites (8.0%), blacks (15.3%), and Hispanics (11.6 percent) showed little or no change in February. The jobless rate for Asians was 6.8%, not seasonally adjusted.

The number of job losers and persons who completed temporary jobs, at 8.3 million, continued to trend down in February and has fallen by 1.2 million over the past 12 months. The number of long-term unemployed (those jobless for 27 weeks or more) was 6.0 million and accounted for 43.9% of the unemployed.

Both the civilian labor force participation rate, at 64.2%, and the employment-population ratio, at 58.4%, were unchanged in February.

The number of persons employed part time for economic reasons (sometimes referred to as involuntary part-time workers) was essentially unchanged at 8.3 million in February. These individuals were working part time because their hours had been cut back or because they were unable to find a full-time job.

In February, 2.7 million persons were marginally attached to the labor force, up from 2.5 million a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) These individuals were not in the labor force, wanted and were available for work, and had looked for a job sometime in the prior 12 months. They were not counted as unemployed because they had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey.

Among the marginally attached, there were 1.0 million discouraged workers in February, a decrease of 184,000 from a year earlier. (These data are not seasonally adjusted.) Discouraged workers are persons not currently looking for work because they believe no jobs are available for them. The remaining 1.7 million persons marginally attached to the labor force in February had not searched for work in the 4 weeks preceding the survey for reasons such as school attendance or family responsibilities.

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